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6/8 in C

 

1. ["The C Quadrille"]. Although this tune carries the names Bride of the Winds and Anoy Jig in Canadian publications (as well as others, like Rock Valley), I hesitate to give it either of those names, because I think they are relatively recent (Harry Jarman, Old Time Dance Tunes, New York: Broadcast Music, Inc., 1951, credits the former to Jim Magill) and probably arbitrary. I also once heard an Iowa fiddler call the tune The Wild Irishman. However, although this tune is almost universal with Michigan fiddlers, it always lacks a name. Given the ubiquity of this tune and its 2/4 version, I suspect that it may have been associated with the spread of the "cotillion" or early square dance in the 1840s and 1850s. In this regard, I noted that a piece called The Fly, in the manuscript music book of Mary B. Bacon (1825-1827), of Scarborough, Maine, later the wife of a Detroit lawyer, Rodney D. Hill, in the Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library, resembles this tune. On the recording Old Catville Quadrille, made in 1924 by "Col." John A. Pattee (1844-1924), a native of New Boston, Michigan, the first change is a version of this tune. A version of this tune, played by Bob Walters, of Nebraska, appears in R. P. Christeson, The Old-Time Fiddler's Repertory, vol. 1 (no. 182). Others, as played by W. Wilbur Neal, originally of Indiana County, Pennsylvania, and by David Gilpin, of Connellsville, Pennsylvania, were recorded by Samuel P. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle, March to the Fife, no. 523). I suspect this was once widely played across America.

a. Nameless tunes played by Varsal Fales, Hastings, Michigan, accompanied by William White, piano, and Bud Pierce, dulcimer, Hastings, Michigan, June 15, 1981. This is a medley of two tunes, both of which are versions of this tune.

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b. Nameless tune played by George Soule, accompanied by various instruments, including guitar (probably played by Clarence Ewing) and piano, at jamboree, Port Hope, Michigan, April 30, 1977.

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c. Nameless tune played by Frank Stevens, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, and Jon Blasius, accordion and guitar, Sand Lake, Michigan, October 1971.

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d. Nameless tune played by Wallace Tuttle, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, and William White, guitar, Lansing, Michigan, February 1, 1977.

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2. Baxter's March and Two-Step, introducing Nancy Lee played by Henry Ford's Old-Fashioned Orchestra (Clayton Perry, violin; Edwin F. Baxter, dulcimer; William Hallup, cimbalom; Maurice Castel, sousaphone). Recorded at New York, New York, May 10, 1927. Columbia 877-D . This record is being included because this seems to have been something that Edwin Baxter (1881-1947), who was originally from around Cheboygan, contributed.

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3. Nameless tune played by Elmer House, Mackinac Island, accompanied by Paul Gifford, guitar, Mackinac Island, Michigan, August 2, 1976. I think this is different enough from no. 1 to identify it as a separate tune, although perhaps not.

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4. Nameless tune played by Pete Keller, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Cross Village, Michigan, September 7, 1976.

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5. Nameless tune in C and A minor played by Gale McAfee, accompanied by Paul Gifford, guitar, Manton, Michigan, May 1976. The first part of this tune is the same as no. 1.

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6. Fascination Quadrille: First Change played by Gale McAfee, accompanied by Paul Gifford, guitar, Manton, Michigan, May 1976. Composed by David S. McCosh (1847-1936), it is the first change of Quadrille: Facination in Gems of the Ball Room (Chicago: E. T. Root, 1888), this is perhaps the most popular tune from the ten booklets issued in the Gems series, but I think this is probably an orally learned version, as Gale includes only the C and F parts, dropping the G part (sorry about my inability to hear the F part at the time of this recording!).

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7. Fascination Quadrille: Second Change played by James Moran, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, St. Clair Shores, Michigan, January 18, 1978. This also was popular enough to have entered the oral tradition. Bill Bigford played it. Bill Walker played a version of it and called it Lancer Quadrille. The Lancers Quadrille itself had died out in Michigan by the time I came along, but this and Bill Bigford's calling the Pacific Quadrille the "Lancer's Quadrille" are indications that other tunes were used for the dance besides the published sets.

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8. Nameless tune in C and G played by Orin Miller, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Scottville, Michigan, September 8, 1977. This sounds to me as if the first part was taken from no. 1.

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9. Nameless tune in C and G played by Wilbert (Bill) Walker, accompanied by Phil Miller, piano, and Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Kinde, Michigan, April 29, 1978. He learned it from Johnny Crease and called it a second change.

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10. Nameless tune in C played by Bill Bigford, accompanied by Albert Hoppes, guitar, Portland, Michigan, about 1968. This sounds like what some called an "old-fashioned two-step." Its phrases are in sixteen bars.

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