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6/8 IN G

 

1. Aldie Barnes' tune played by Bill Bigford, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Bob Fleck, guitar, Marion, Michigan, winter 1977. Alton ("Aldie") Barnes (1880-1963), of Portland, grew up playing the dulcimer at dances with his brother Bill; they may have provided the inspiration for the drawing of the musicians in the book Dances of Our Pioneers (1926), by Grace Ryan, who was from Portland. During the 1920s, in an editorial in the local newspaper praising Henry Ford's revival of old-time dancing, the brothers (called the "Skunk Hunters' Band") were praised. Bill played with Aldie and a guitar player named Albert Hoppes at the Portland Hotel about 1960 or earlier and learned this tune from Aldie, who played it on the dulcimer.

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2. Nameless tune in G and D played by Stewart Carmichael, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, and Jon Blasius, guitar, Evart, Michigan, October 1971. As Stewart was wont to do, he identified this tune by the call that he associated with this tune, "Form a Star with the Right Hand Across."

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3. Nameless tune played by Bud Cease, accompanied by Dan Johnston, tenor banjo, and Paul Gifford, guitar, Harbor Springs, Michigan, September 7, 1977.

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4. Nameless tune played by Bud Cease, accompanied by Dan Johnston, tenor banjo, and Paul Gifford, guitar, Harbor Springs, Michigan, September 7, 1977. The 2-1-1 cadential endings identify the tune (by my method) as a jig (presumably an Irish jig), rather than a American or Canadian quadrille, as are most of the others on this page.

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5. All Hands Around played by Jerry Henderson, accompanied by Paul Jones, piano, Art Weiss, drums; calls by Sam Clark. Recorded in Detroit, early 1950s, issued as Michigan Square Dance Record and Recording Co., J-2-B, the call described as "Plain Quadrille No. 1," or, in other words, a first change. Composed by David S. McCosh (1847-1936), of Mount Morris, Illinois, this tune appears as the first change of Quadrille: "All Hands Round" in Gems of the Ball Room (Chicago: E. T. Root & Sons, 1888), p. 2.

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6. Paddy Boone played by Fred Elton, accompanied by Stewart Carmichael, dulcimer, and Lulu Carmichael, piano, at jamboree, Elk Rapids, Michigan, October 16, 1976.

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7. Nameless tune played by Elmer House, accompanied by Paul Gifford, guitar, Mackinac Island, Michigan, August 2, 1976.

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8. Nameless tune played by Elmer House, accompanied by Paul Gifford, guitar, Mackinac Island, Michigan, August 2, 1976.

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9. Nameless tune played by Pete Keller, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Cross Village, Michigan, September 7, 1976.

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10. Irishman's Shanty played by Pete Keller, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Cross Village, Michigan, September 7, 1976. The song "Did You Ever Go Into an Irishman's Shanty" is invariably sung to the tune of Irish Washerwoman. This is a completely different tune.

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11. Nameless tune in G and D played by Luke LaFrenier, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, August 18, 1978.

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12. Nameless tune in G and D played by Dallas Langham, accompanied by Fordney Cushman, second violin, William White, dulcimer, Paul Gifford, piano, Okemos, Michigan, June 1982.

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13. [Joys of Wedlock]. These two unnamed tunes resemble on called Joys of Wedlock in 1000 Fiddle Tunes (thanks to Philippe Varlet for this identification), although not closely.

a. Nameless tune played by Dallas Langham, accompanied by Fordney Cushman, second violin, William White, dulcimer, Paul Gifford, piano, Okemos, Michigan, June 1982.

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b. Nameless tune played by Russell Nelson, accompanied by Paul Gifford, second fiddle, and William White, guitar, Lansing, Michigan, January 7, 1978.

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14. Nameless tune played by Gale McAfee, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Manton, Michigan, May, 1976. A jig.

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15. Nameless tune in G and D played by Walter Meske, accompanied by various instruments, at jamboree, Port Hope, Michigan, April 30, 1978.

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16. Nameless tune played by Walter Meske, accompanied by various instruments, at jamboree, Port Hope, Michigan, April 30, 1978. This might be regarded as a variant of the tune in G in 6/8 known in the area stretching from southeastern New York to northwestern Ohio, typified by the first change of Ticknor's Quadrille, recorded by Henry Ford's Old-Time Dance Orchestra in 1926.

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17. Nameless tune played by Orin Miller, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Scottville, Michigan, September 8, 1977.

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18. Nameless tune in G and D played by Wallace Tuttle, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, and William White, guitar, Lansing, Michigan, February 1, 1977. He thought he may have learned this from Nelson Harkness, a farmer of Locke Township, who, like Tuttle, later moved to Lansing.

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