24A

 

2/4 IN A MAJOR

 

1. Devil Shake the Half-Breed

a. Devil Shake the Half-Breed played by Bill Cameron, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Brimley, Michigan, August 13, 1977. A tape of a fiddler named Jesse Gatten, of Danbury, Wisconsin, sent to me by Paul Tyler, included a tune by this name, but it was Rickett's Hornpipe. Evidently the title was a floater, and as an Indian, Bill evidently was attracted to it. The tune appears as Mountain Reel in 1000 Fiddle Tunes.

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b. Nameless tune played by Elmer House, accompanied by Paul Gifford, guitar, Mackinac Island, Michigan, August 2, 1976.

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2. Nameless tune played by Fordney Cushman, accompanied by William White, dulcimer, and Paul Gifford, piano, Okemos, Michigan, June 1982.

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3. Nameless tune played by Varsal Fales, accompanied by William White, dulcimer, Bud Pierce, guitar, and Paul Gifford, piano, Hastings, Michigan, June 14, 1981. The second part sounds something like Wake Up Susan, but the first part is completely different.

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4. [Bummer's Reel] played by Helen Gross, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Saline, Michigan, April 25, 1978. Although her version, which she probably learned from her father, varies considerably from the printed versions (one name is Levantine's Barrel), it is clearly this tune, which seems to have strong Pennsylvania associations. It appears as a tune for a cotillion change in the manuscript of the immigrant German fiddler August Mueller, of Au Glaize County, Ohio, dating from the 1850s, at The Henry Ford (Acc. 285, Box 533).

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5. Nameless tune played by August Hasted, Spring Lake, Michigan, September 22, 1985.

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6. Nameless tune played by Elmer House, accompanied by Paul Gifford, guitar, Mackinac Island, August 2, 1976.

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7. [Up and Up] played by Gale McAfee, accompanied by Paul Gifford, guitar, Manton, Michigan, May 1976. This was published in the series Gems of the Ball-Room.

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8. [Ace of Spades]. The first part of this tune indicates that this belongs to a tune family of mostly nameless tunes; Frank Stevens and Jasper Warner played versions. Benny Thomasson of Texas played one, Ace of Spades, and Paul Van Arsdale of New York plays one of his grandfather's tunes that also belong. Neither of the following versions have the usual second part.

a. Nameless tune played by Orin Miller, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Scottville, Michigan, September 8, 1977.

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b. Nameless tune played by Helen Gross, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Saline, Michigan, April 25, 1978.

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9. Nameless tune played by Orin Miller, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Scottville, Michigan, September 8, 1977.

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10. Calkins' Jig; Pat Moran's tune (medley) played by James Moran, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, St. Clair Shores, Michigan, January 18, 1978. He explains how the first tune was written, half by his great-uncle Patrick Moran (1842-1907), the other half by Fred Calkins. The second part of the second tune bears some resemblance to the Canadian tune Cotton-Eyed Joe.

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11. Laddie, Come-a Do (Madam, I Have Gold and Silver) played by Kenneth Smith, Pickford, Michigan, August 31, 1977. This is an unusual example of a true folk song also played as a dance tune. He recites and sings part of the lyrics and explains the plot of the song. This song is found fairly widely in regional collections of folk songs.

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