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2/4 IN C

 

1. [Nameless tune]. This grouping encompasses 2/4 versions of the 6/8 tune whose Canadian published name is Bride of the Winds or Anoy Jig. A Canadian name of a tune in this grouping is Waylon's Breakdown. Such names, we should note, are a result mostly of the Canadian fiddling tradition's association with publication of various kinds, whether print, sound recordings, or radio. In tradition there, these tunes, no doubt, as in Michigan, lacked names.

a. Nameless tune played by Bill Bigford, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Marion, Michigan, winter 1977.

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b. Nameless tune played by Pete Keller, accompanied by Paul Gifford, tenor banjo, and Bob Fleck, guitar, Cross Village, Michigan, January 30, 1977.

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c. Poston's Jig played by Merritt Olsen, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Birmingham, Michigan, April 1976. He called by this name, because the man from whom he had learned it, Charlie Jones, of Birmingham, but originally from Hesperia, Michigan, had learned it from a man named Poston.

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d. Nameless tune played by Wilbert (Bill) Walker, accompanied by Phil Miller, piano, and Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Kinde, Michigan, April 29, 1978. As he says in the recording, he learned it as a boy from Jim Filion, whose playing, preserved on acetate discs by Walker, is featured elsewhere on this site.

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2. Nameless tune played by Varsal Fales, accompanied by William White, piano, and Bud Pierce, dulcimer, Hastings, Michigan, January 14, 1981. Because that day Bill kept whistling that tune, Les Raber later referred to this unnamed tune as Bill White. I wonder if this is related to a tune Harvey St. Pierre (1908-1977) of Paincourt, Ontario used to play, and whether these are related to Billy in the Low Ground, a well-known Southern tune.

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3. Nameless tune played by Helen Gross, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Saline, Michigan, April 25, 1978. This resembles the following tune in some ways, but the tunes probably can be regarded as distinct.

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4. Jumpin' Toothache played by Gale McAfee, accompanied by Paul Gifford, guitar, Manton, Michigan, May 1976.

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5. Nameless tune played by Gale McAfee, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Manton, Michigan, May 1976. Gale says that a young fellow who lived near his parents, Paul "Ipp," who died in World War I, played the tune. Curiously, Lotus Dickey, of Orange County, Indiana, also played this tune.

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6. Ten Strike played by Gale McAfee, accompanied by Paul Gifford, dulcimer, Manton, Michigan, April 15, 1976. Composed by David S. McCosh (1847-1936), of Mount Morris, Illinois, this tune appears as the fourth change of Quadrille: "Ten Strike" in Gems of the Ball Room (Chicago: E. T. Root, 1888), p. 6. Les Raber liked to play it, and he popularized it. Another version of it carries the name Oklahoma Rooster. Clearly out of hundreds in the Gems series, this was one of the few that went into oral tradition.

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7. Nameless tune in C and A minor played by Luke LaFrenier, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, August 18, 1978. The minor part suggests a relationship to the Quebecois tune Pointe-au-Pic, but probably I am being a little generous here.

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