banner

 

2/4 IN F AND B Flat

 

1. Sauger Lake Quadrille: Second Change. Wallace Tuttle gave me a manuscript of tunes he had learned by ear as a young man (thus probably around 1910), and it included some items that he or someone had evidently copied. These included a quadrille with this name, credited to one Loranger (no doubt Eli Loranger [1839-1903], of Williamston, Michigan, who led a quadrille band). The second change was familiar to me from having heard different Michigan fiddlers play different versions of the tune, all without names. Thus I am calling this tune by this name. In Canada, I heard it as Atlantic Polka No. 2, something popularized by Don Messer. A version of this tune appears in Missouri as Ragged Bill or Ragged-Ass Bill. Because of this geographical range I am inclined to believe that it originated in Michigan. There are several Sauger Lakes, but one larger one is near the village of Constantine, in St. Joseph County. This was the home of John Hull (1816-1884), a pioneer dancing master and leader of the Hull and Arnold Quadrille Band, which from 1838 toured throughout the state and Midwest, playing at important balls. He was said to be musically literate, making arrangements for his group from piano scores of songs popular in his day. It is not unlikely that Hull may have composed and popularized it, naming it after a nearby lake.

a. Nameless tune played by Gale McAfee, accompanied by Paul Gifford, electronic organ, Manton, Michigan, May 1976.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

b. Nameless tune in G and D played by Pete Keller, accompanied by Paul Gifford, Cross Village, Michigan, September 7, 1976. Bill Cameron also played this tune in the same keys.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

2. Nameless tune in F played by Wilbur Brown, accompanied by Pete Keller, tenor banjo, Paul Gifford, dulcimer, and Daniel Johnston, piano, Harbor Springs, Michigan, September 6, 1977.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

3. Nameless tune in F played by Wilbur Brown, accompanied by Pete Keller, tenor banjo, Paul Gifford, dulcimer, and Daniel Johnston, piano, Harbor Springs, Michigan, September 6, 1977.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

4. Nameless tune in B flat and F played by Wilbur Brown, accompanied by Daniel Johnston, piano, Pete Keller, tenor banjo, Harbor Springs, Michigan, September 6, 1977. This is a 2/4 version of a 6/8 tune (a version of which by Russ Nelson is included on this website), which is probably the original, although of very obscure origin.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

5. Nameless tune in F and D minor played by Bill Cameron, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano , Brimley, Michigan, August 13, 1977. He learned this tune in Canada, from a brother of Alec Ticks.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

6. Nameless tune in F played by Varsal Fales and Les Raber, accompanied by Bud Pierce, guitar, Paul Gifford, piano, William White, dulcimer, Hastings, Michigan, June 15, 1981.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

7. Nameless tune in F played by Helen Gross, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Saline, Michigan, April 25, 1978.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

8. Nameless tune in B flat and F played by Helen Gross, accompanied by Paul Gifford, piano, Saline, Michigan, April 25, 1978.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

9. Nameless tune in F and C played by Luke LaFrenier, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, August 18, 1978. He learned this from Simon Masse, a well-known fiddler from the Garden River Reserve across the border in Ontario.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

10. Nameless tune in B flat played by Gale McAfee, accompanied by Paul Gifford, electronic organ, Manton, Michigan, May 1976.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

11. Nameless tune in B flat played by George Pariseau, accompanied by Mina Pariseau Hurdell, piano, Bad Axe, Michigan, 1941. This is Bamford Hornpipe in 1000 Fiddle Tunes. Pariseau could not read music, but he must have had access to Ryan's Mammoth Collection or other publications and learned them indirectly.

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player